Wednesday, October 31, 2007

Happy Halloween - Be Safe Out There!



Weather History - Halloween! BOO!

1950 - Unseasonably warm weather prevailed in the central U.S. for Halloween. The temperature soared to 83 degrees at Minneapolis MN, their warmest reading of record for so late in the season.

1987 - Halloween was a wet one in the southwestern U.S. Heavy rain in southern California resulted in numerous mudslides. Weather-related auto accidents resulted in three deaths and twenty-five injuries. Mount Wilson CA received 3.14 inches of rain in 24 hours. Yakima WA reported measurable rainfall for the first time since the 18th of July. The 103 day long dry spell was their longest of record.

1988 - Twenty-two cities in the northeastern U.S. reported record low temperatures for the date. The low of 19 degrees at Cleveland OH was a record for October, and morning lows of 21 degrees at Allentown PA and Bridgeport CT tied October records. Nine cities in the southwestern U.S. reported record high temperatures for the date, including Phoenix AZ with a reading of 96 degrees. Showers made Halloween a soggy one in the southeastern U.S.

1989 - Halloween night was a soggy one in New England. Showers in the northeastern U.S. produced more than an inch and a half of rain in six hours at some locations. An invasion of cold arctic air brought an abrupt end to a week of "Indian Summer" type weather in the Great Lakes Region, and brought snow and subzero wind chill readings to the Northern Plains. In Colorado, Alamosa was the cold spot in the nation with a record low of two degrees above zero, and a Halloween night storm brought 3 to 6 inches of snow to the Front Range, and 5 to 10 inches to the nearby foothills. Icy streets around Denver the next morning made for a rather spooky commute.

1991 - The Halloween Mega Storm happened on this date in 1991. Blizzard conditions were experienced throughout the Upper Midwest as Duluth, Minn. picked up 37 inches of snow. Minneapolis, Minn. picked up 28 inches of snow. Both of these values were single storm records for the respective cities.

Pleasant Fall Weather Continues

Pleasant conditions will continue for the next several days. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

Wednesday is going to be another beautiful day with plentiful sunshine and daytime highs in the middle 70's.

A nice forecast is in store for all the Trick or Treaters tonight. As you head out Wednesday evening for Fall Festivals or in the neighborhood door to door, grab your jacket because temperatures will be falling after sunset dropping to the mid 50s by 10pm. So prepare for another chilly evening with clear skies and overnight lows falling into the upper 40's.

A dry cold front will approach us on Thursday, reinforcing the cool autumn air just in time for the weekend. Therefore, mornings will continue to be clear and cool in the mid to upper 40s and the afternoons will be mild with temperatures in the upper 60's and low 70's right on through Saturday and Sunday.

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Weather History - Oct. 30

1925 - Nashville, TN, was blanketed with an inch of snow, their earliest measurable snow of record.

1947 - In a typical atmosphere, temperature decreases with height. The opposite of this, a temperature inversion, can trap unwanted particles close to the ground. For instance, on this date in 1947, the Donora, Penn. smog disaster ended after five days. For five days an inversion trapped impurities in the lower atmosphere over the Monongahela Valley killing 20 persons, and leaving more than 2000 others sick.

Oregon's Mt. Hood

Disclaimer: It is a touchy subject. Climate Change, Global Warming, whatever..... I don't want to get into the debate of GW and the like, I just want to share an interesting picture and article with you. Seriously, that's it.

Click on the image for a larger, more detailed picture.
Oregon's Mt. Hood

The side-by-side photographs illustrate how Oregon's Mt. Hood has changed over the past Century. The photograph on the left is from autumn of 1984; the photograph on the right was taken in autumn of 2002.

Oregon’s highest peak, Mt. Hood, provides residents of Northwest Oregon with a familiar yet spectacular snow-capped vista. This view is changing, however, as a two degree Celsius warming trend in the Portland Region over the last Century has been accompanied by the seven largest of Mt. Hood’s eleven glaciers have each lost an average of 34 percent of their mass. Sandy Glacier, the large glacier at the center of these photographs, lost 40 percent of its mass over the last 100 years.

(Source: Jackson, K.M. and Fountain, A.G. 2006. Spatial and morphological change on Eliot Glacier, Mount Hood, Oregon, USA. Annals of Glaciology, vol. 46.)

Nice Fall Weather Continues

Beautiful weather continues for much of this week. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

It's going to be another beautiful day today with plentiful sunshine and a high near 72. Typically this time of year, highs are around 70 degrees with overnight lows near 46 degrees. Well, we are right on target for this time of year with the seasonable temperatures. High pressure will continue to keep us dry for the next several days.

As a result, we will continue to see sunny skies today with temperatures warming up to around 72 degrees.

Tonight, expect another clear and crisp night with lows in the mid to upper 40s.
Trick or Treaters are in for a real treat, the weather! It's going to be a beautiful day on Wednesday with daytime highs in the middle 70's. As you head out Wednesday evening, temperatures will be in the upper 60's around sunset dropping to the lower 50s by 10pm. Don't forget your jacket as you head out the door!

Despite a dry cold front approaching on Thursday, mornings will continue to be clear and cool in the mid to upper 40s and the afternoons will be mild with temperatures in the upper 60's and low 70's right on through the weekend.

Enjoy a great string of Fall weather!

Monday, October 29, 2007

T.S. Noel

...NOEL SLIGHTLY STRONGER...
...HEAVY RAINS EXPECTED ACROSS HISPANIOLA...PORTIONS OF THE BAHAMAS...AND EASTERN CUBA...

AT 500 PM EDT...2100Z...THE CENTER OF TROPICAL STORM NOEL WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 20.9 NORTH...LONGITUDE 74.2 WEST OR ABOUT 50MILES... 80 KM...NORTH OF THE EASTERN TIP OF CUBA AND ABOUT 215MILES...340 KM...SOUTH-SOUTHEAST OF GREAT EXUMA ISLAND IN THE CENTRAL BAHAMAS.

NOEL IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHWEST NEAR 15 MPH...24 KM/HR...AND THIS GENERAL MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE DURING THE NEXT 24HOURS. ON THIS TRACK...THE CENTER OF NOEL SHOULD MOVE BETWEEN THE CENTRAL BAHAMAS AND THE NORTHERN COAST OF CUBA TONIGHT AND TOMORROW.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 50 MPH...85 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER GUSTS. SLIGHT STRENGTHENING IS POSSIBLE DURING THE NEXT 24 HOURS.

TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 200 MILES...325 KM FROM THE CENTER.

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1001 MB...29.56 INCHES.

NOEL IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 10 TO 20INCHES OVER HISPANIOLA...WITH POSSIBLE ISOLATED MAXIMUM TOTALS OF30 INCHES. TOTAL ACCUMULATIONS OF 5 TO 10 INCHES...WITH POSSIBLE MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 15 INCHES...ARE POSSIBLE OVER SOUTHEASTERN CUBA...AND THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHEASTERN BAHAMAS. ADDITIONAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 3 TO 5 INCHES ARE POSSIBLE OVER PUERTO RICO THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING. THESE RAINS...PARTICULARLY IN HISPANIOLA...ARE EXPECTED TO CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING FLASH FLOODS AND MUD SLIDES.

Weather History - Oct. 29

1956 - A violent tornado, or series of tornadoes, moved along a path more than 100 miles in length from south of North Platte NE into Rock County NE. It was an unusually late occurence so far north and west in the U.S. for such a storm.

1989 - Thunderstorms developing along a cold front produced severe weather in Oklahoma and north central Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours. Thunderstorms in Oklahoma produced weak tornadoes near Snyder and Davidson, and produced hail two inches in diameter at Altus. Large hail damaged 60 to 80 percent of the cotton crop in Tillman County OK. Nine cities in the northeastern U.S. reported record high temperatures for the date as readings warmed into the 70s. For Marquette MI it marked their fifth straight day of record warmth. Arctic cold invaded the western U.S. Lows of 7 degrees at Alamosa CO and 9 degrees at Elko NV were records for the date

Sunday, October 28, 2007

Tropical Storm Noel

TROPICAL STORM NOEL INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY NUMBER 5A
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL162007
800 PM EDT SUN OCT 28 2007

..NOEL MEANDERING...PRODUCING HEAVY RAINS OVER HISPANIOLA...

AT 800 PM EDT...0000Z...THE CENTER OF TROPICAL STORM NOEL WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 16.7 NORTH...LONGITUDE 71.8 WEST OR ABOUT 135MILES...215 KM...SOUTH-SOUTHEAST OF PORT AU PRINCE HAITI AND ABOUT310 MILES...500 KM...SOUTHEAST OF GUANTANAMO CUBA.

NOEL HAS BEEN MEANDERING...WITH LITTLE OVERALL MOTION...OVER THE PAST FEW HOURS. A MOTION TOWARD THE NORTH-NORTHWEST NEAR 5 MPH...7KM/HR...IS EXPECTED OVER THE NEXT 24 HOURS. ON THIS TRACK...THE CENTER OF NOEL WILL MOVE NEAR OR OVER SOUTHWESTERN HAITI BY EARLY MONDAY.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 60 MPH...95 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER GUSTS. SOME ADDITIONAL STRENGTHENING IS FORECAST DURING THE NEXT24 HOURS.

NOEL IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 8 TO 12INCHES OVER HISPANIOLA...SOUTHEASTERN CUBA...AND JAMAICA...WITH POSSIBLE ISOLATED MAXIMUM TOTALS OF 20 INCHES. ADDITIONAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 3 TO 5 INCHES ARE EXPECTED OVER PUERTO RICO DURING THE NEXT 24 HOURS. THESE RAINS COULD CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING FLASH FLOODS AND MUDSLIDES.

Weather History - Oct. 28



A major storm dumped five feet of snow on a pass in the Sierra Nevadas on this date in 1846, trapping 79 people along with their cattle and wagons. Only 45 people survived the winter and the group came to be known as the Donner Party, and the pass was renamed Donner Pass.

Saturday, October 27, 2007

CoCoRaHS - Coming to Alabama November 1st

Say What?

What IS CoCoRaHS?
There is a new way to let the National Weather Service know how much rain, hail, or snow you've measured in your back yard! The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow (CoCoRaHS) Network is coming to Alabama November 1st. CoCoRaHS is a unique, non-profit, community-based network of volunteers of all ages and backgrounds working together to measure and map precipitation (rain, hail and snow). The program will help meteorologists, hydrologists, and researchers study the variability of precipitation across the Tennessee Valley, and the accumulated data will be available to anyone with a use or interest in precipitation data.


How did CoCoRaHS get started?
CoCoRaHS started because of a devastating flood that struck Fort Collins, Colorado in 1998. When researchers went back to examine the precipitation data, they discovered that the rainfall leading to the flood missed all of the official gages. Colorado State Climatologist Nolan Doeskin developed a new volunteer observing network to fill in the gaps between official gages called CoCoRaHS.


Sounds great! How can I sign up?
There are three options available, depending on where you live and the measuring equipment you have.


To find out more, visit the CoCoRaHS web site. If you'd like to sign up, just visit the web site and click on "Join CoCoRaHS" to register your backyard or schoolyard as a reporting site. Once you register and begin to report--starting November 1 in Alabama--your observations will become part of the record and will be plotted on maps of your county and state. You can view the maps and see how your observation fits in with your neighbors.

If you decide to sign up, we encourage you to go through the online training located on the CoCoRaHS web site. It will detail proper gage siting techniques as well as other program information. Note that you will need to provide your own rain gage (you can purchase one through CoCoRaHS, and more details can be found on the CoCoRaHS site).

How can I find out more?
If you'd like to know more about local CoCoRaHS efforts, feel free to contact
Michael Garrison and Kristina Sumrall by email, or call the National Weather Service office in Birmingham at 205-621-3010. To find out more, visit the CoCoRaHS web site.
For more information about the CHARM network, visit their website at
http://www.ghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/charm/. (Courtesy of the NWS)

Anatomy of a Wildfire

Fire: A Product of the Environment
Fuel, heat, and oxygen form what is known as the “fire triangle.” With these elements in place, all that is required for a fire to start is an ignition source, such as lightning or a match. A fire’s intensity is determined by a variety of factors including the amount of available fuel (trees, grasses, leaves, and other debris), weather conditions, and the layout of the land. Fires spread easily when the weather is…

• Hot: Fire intensity is generally directly proportional to the temperature.
• Dry: The less humid the air, the more easily fire burns.
• Windy: Wind brings in extra oxygen and helps fire spread.

In California, the warm Santa Ana winds, which occur in the fall and winter, combined with low humidity and dry land conditions, create ideal wildfire conditions.

The Current Situation
Over 100,000 wildfires fires occur every year in the United States. Wildfire
activity is seasonal: In the West, most fires occur between June and October,
in the Southeast the fire season is generally March through June, and most
fires occur in New England in the autumn.

• California: As of October 24, 2007, 15 wildfires in California were burning more than 414,000 acres of land.
• Year-to-Date: Since January 1, 2007, there have been 76,575 wildfires in the U.S., which have burned 8,346,757 acres of land.

Protect Your Home and Property from Wildfire
• Find out when wildfire is most likely to occur in your area by visiting the US Forest Service “Normal Peak Wildfire Seasons” tool: www.firewise.org/resources/peak_fire_seasons/index.html.
• Thirty feet around your house should be a “lean, green, and clean” defensible space:
o Lean: Prune trees and shrubs, and make sure that overhanging tree branches are no less than 15 feet from any structure. The lowest branches on trees should be six- to ten-feet from the ground.
o Green: Plant healthy, fire-resistant plants. Your local garden center of County Extension Office can help you find plants that are right for your property and climate.
o Clean: Remove easily flammable vegetation, including leaves, dead wood and firewood, and dry grass.
• Keep your lawn mowed, especially if the grass is dry.
• Remove dead leaves and other debris from your gutters.
• Use fire-resistant building materials whenever possible. Consider using slate, metal, or clay roofing materials; wood roofing is particularly vulnerable to fire.
• Double paned windows made with tempered glass hold up against fire much better than single paned windows; plastic skylights can melt under high temperatures.
• Hosing down your yard and especially your roof when a wildfire is close by can help to keep the flames from consuming your property. Make sure your hose is in good working order.
• Pay attention to local weather warnings and have a home evacuation plan in place. Always follow the evacuation and safety directions issued by local authorities.
• For more information on protecting your home visit Firewise Communities: www.firewise.org.

Friday, October 26, 2007

Weekend Outdoor Activities

We have been so lucky to have such nice fall weather on the weekends this past month. Our last weekend of October will offer another round of pleasant conditions, so get outdoors!

Saturday:

Visit a pumkin patch

Take the children to Boo at the Zoo

Magic City Classic parade

Magic City Classic football game

Take a hike at Oak Mountain or Ruffner Mountain

Go to a haunted house


Sunday:

Vulcan Aftertunes

Soil Conservation

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that up to 56 million dollars in economic losses result from crop erosion in the U.S. each year. In some areas of Alabama, soil loss due to wind and rain erosion can be up to eight tons per acre per year! Wind erosion can be particularly problematic in dry areas.
Viewer Tip: Farmers can use various methods to reduce soil erosion in their crop fields. One of the most common, low-cost methods is conservation tillage, which leaves left-over ground cover on the field to reduce erosion. Other methods include planting cover crops that grow in late-fall to provide soil protection during the winter months, or planting rows of shrubs and trees to act as windbreaks around crop fields.

View soil erosion maps at the NRCS "State of the Land" Web site: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/TECHNICAL/land/erosion.html

(Source: USDA Economic Research Service: Global Resources and Productivity Briefing Room, http://www.ers.usda.gov/briefing/GlobalResources/Questions/grq2.htm; US EPA, AG101: Soil Preparation, http://www.epa.gov/agriculture/ag101/cropsoil.html)

Weather History - Oct. 26

1987 - Five cities in south central Texas reported record high temperatures for the date, including Corpus Christi and Del Rio with readings of 93 degrees. Laredo TX was the hot spot in the nation with a high of 98 degrees. Thunderstorms moving over the Lower Mississippi Valley deluged Lake Charles LA with 2.70 inches of rain in one hour resulting in severe local flooding.

1988 - Thunderstorms moving out of northern Texas spawned five tornadoes in Louisiana during the morning hours. The thunderstorms also produced wind gusts to 75 mph at Jennings LA, and the driver of a vehicle was killed by a falling tree near Coushatta LA. Snow squalls in the Lower Great Lakes Region produced heavy snow in western New York State, with 12 inches reported at Colden.

Nice Weekend Forecast

Lots of sunshine and mild temperatures expected just in time for our weekend. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

A broad area of Low Pressure that has brought showers to the deep south the last few days is moving away from us. As a result, we will see decreasing clouds throughout the day with partly cloudy skies this afternoon. Daytime highs will be around 66 degrees.
If you are headed out to any of the high school games Friday night, expect mostly clear skies with overnight lows dipping down into the upper 40's once again. Don't forget your jacket as you head out the door tonight!

By Saturday and Sunday, High Pressure builds in across the southeastern U.S. This will bring back plenty of sunshine just in time for the weekend. Highs will be around 70 and overnight lows in the upper 40's. Typically for late October we have daytime highs around 72 degrees with overnight lows near 48. So enjoy a great weekend of seasonable fall weather!

Thursday, October 25, 2007

Rain No Help for Drought (Yet)


HYDROLOGIC OUTLOOK
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BIRMINGHAM AL
1000 AM CDT THU OCT 25 2007

...DROUGHT INFORMATION STATEMENT FOR CENTRAL ALABAMA...

SYNOPSIS...
SOME MUCH NEEDED AND MUCH WELCOMED RAINFALL OCCURRED ACROSS CENTRAL ALABAMA DURING THE PAST WEEK AS A COLD FRONT AND UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM AFFECTED THE AREA. DESPITE THIS RAINFALL...THERE WAS ONLY SOME SLIGHT IMPROVEMENT IN THE SEVERE DROUGHT CONDITIONS PLAGUING THE AREA. THE LATEST U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR HAS THE EXCEPTIONAL DROUGHT AREA EAST OF A LINE FROM HACKLEBURG TO NEAR CARROLLTON TO JUST EAST OF LINDEN. MOST AREAS WEST OF THIS LINE REMAIN IN SEVERE TO EXTREME DROUGHT CONDITIONS. THE DROUGHT MONITOR CLASSIFIES DROUGHT WITHIN ONE OF THESE FIVE CATEGORIES:

1) ABNORMALLY DRY
2) MODERATE
3) SEVERE
4) EXTREME
5) EXCEPTIONAL

DURING THE PAST WEEK HIGH PRESSURE PREVAILED WITH MOSTLY DRY CONDITIONS THROUGH THE WEEKEND. HOWEVER...A COLD FRONT AND UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM SPREAD MOISTURE AND RAINFALL ACROSS CENTRAL ALABAMA MONDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY. MOST AREAS RECEIVED BETWEEN ONE AND THREE INCHES OF RAIN...WITH VERY LOCALIZED TOTALS TO NEAR 4 INCHES. THIS RAINFALL PROVIDED ONLY SOME SLIGHT RELIEF TO THE DROUGHT CONDITIONS...AS VERY DRY SOIL SOAKED UP MOST OF RAINFALL AND VERY LITTLE RUNOFF MADE ITS WAY INTO RIVERS AND STREAMS. THIS MORNING...SOME PATCHY DRIZZLE AND VERY LIGHT RAIN WAS STILL OCCURRING AS THE UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTINUED TO MEANDER ACROSS THE AREA.

RAINFALL SO FAR THIS MONTH IS AVERAGING FROM NEAR AN INCH IN SOME OF THE EXTREME EASTERN SECTIONS OF CENTRAL ALABAMA...TO OVER FIVE INCHES IN THE EXTREME WEST. NORMAL RAINFALL FOR OCTOBER ACROSS CENTRAL ALABAMA AVERAGES BETWEEN TWO AND A HALF AND THREE AND A HAL FINCHES.

SOME PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS FOR CENTRAL ALABAMA JANUARY 1ST THROUGH OCTOBER 24TH:

BIRMINGHAM 25.21
MONTGOMERY 32.11
ANNISTON 16.19
TUSCALOOSA 21.07
CALERA 28.03
TROY 33.42

AVERAGE PRECIPITATION EXPECTED AND DEPARTURE FROM NORMAL FROM JANUARY 1ST THROUGH OCTOBER 24TH:
BIRMINGHAM 44.09 DOWN 18.88
MONTGOMERY 44.61 DOWN 12.50
ANNISTON 42.88 DOWN 26.69
TUSCALOOSA 46.54 DOWN 25.47

AGRICULTURAL IMPACTS...
SOIL MOISTURES DEPARTURES HAVE IMPROVED SOME DUE TO THE RECENT RAINFALL...ESPECIALLY IN SOUTHERN AND WESTERN SECTIONS OF CENTRAL ALABAMA. AREAS WEST AND SOUTH OF A LINE FROM NEAR ADDISON TO CENTREVILLE TO OPELIKA HAVE IMPROVED INTO THE 10 TO 30 PERCENTILE OF NORMAL RANGE. HOWEVER...AREAS NORTH AND EAST OF THIS LINE ARE STILL BELOW 10 PERCENTILE OF NORMAL.

SERIOUS AGRICULTURAL IMPACTS CONTINUE. ACCORDING TO THE USDA...THE RECENT RAINFALL HAS COME TOO LATE TO HELP MANY CROPS AND HAS DONE VERY LITTLE TO ALLEVIATE THE DROUGHT CONDITIONS. SOME PERCENTAGES OF POOR AND VERY POOR CONDITIONS REPORTED BY THE USDA INCLUDE:

COTTON.....68 PERCENT
SOYBEANS...80 PERCENT
PEANUTS....41 PERCENT
LIVESTOCK..59 PERCENT
PASTURE....78 PERCENT

ACCORDING TO THE USDA THE SOYBEAN CROP REMAINS IN VERY POOR CONDITION. PASTURE CONDITIONS HAVE REMAINED POOR...WITH VERY LITTLE GRASS AVAILABLE TO LIVESTOCK FOR GRAZING. WHAT HAY IS AVAILABLE IS BEING FED TO LIVESTOCK. THE COTTON HARVEST HAS ALSO SUFFERED SEVERELY.

FIRE DANGER IMPACTS...THE FIRE DANGER RISK REMAINS HIGH ACROSS MUCH OF CENTRAL ALABAMA...BUT CONDITIONS HAVE IMPROVED SOMEWHAT DUE TO RECENT RAINFALL. THE KEETCH-BYRAM DROUGHT INDICES (KBDI)...REMAIN GENERALLY IN THE 600 TO ABOVE 700 RANGE NORTH OF A LINE FROM NEAR LIVINGSTON TO ALABASTER TO AUBURN. THIS INDICATES A HIGH FIRE DANGER CONTINUES. HOWEVER...TO THE SOUTH OF THIS LINE INDICES HAVE IMPROVED INTO THE 350 TO 500RANGE...INDICATING A LESS SEVERE FIRE DANGER AT THIS TIME.

THE ALABAMA FORESTRY COMMISSION HAS CURRENTLY LIFTED THE FIRE ALERT FOR ALL COUNTIES IN CENTRAL ALABAMA.

HYDROLOGIC IMPACTS...
STREAM FLOWS HAVE SHOWN SOME IMPROVEMENT DUE TO THE RECENT RAINFALL.WEST OF A LINE FROM ROUGHLY MONTGOMERY TO CLANTON TO WEISS LAKE...USGS GAGING SITES HAVE MOSTLY IMPROVED INTO THE 25 TO 89 PERCENTILE OF NORMAL RANGE. EVEN TO THE EAST OF THIS LINE...ALTHOUGH MANY STREAM FLOWS STILL REMAIN VERY LOW...SOME IMPROVEMENT HAS OCCURRED FROM THIS WEEK`S RAINFALL.

DESPITE THE RAINFALL...MAJOR RIVERS AND RESERVOIRS CONTINUE MUCH BELOW NORMAL WITH SERIOUS NEGATIVE IMPACTS CONTINUING. POOL LEVELS IN MOST MAJOR RESERVOIRS ARE AT OR BELOW NORMAL WINTER LEVELS...WITH SOME APPROACHING RECORD LOW LEVELS. SOME OF THE MOST SERIOUS IMPACTS CONTINUE ON THE COOSA AND TALLAPOOSA RIVERS...WHERE MANY BOAT LANDINGS HAVE BECOME UNUSABLE DUE TO EXTREMELY LOW LAKE LEVELS. ON LAKE MARTIN...ALL MARINAS HAVE SHUT DOWN BECAUSE THERE IS NO ACCESS TO THEM DUE TO EXTREMELY LOW LAKE LEVELS. UNLESS ADDITIONAL SIGNIFICANT RAINFALL OCCURS...NO REAL IMPROVEMENT IN THESE CONDITIONS IS LIKELY IN THE NEAR FUTURE.

SOCIAL IMPACTS...RECENT RAINFALL HAS AIDED LAWNS AND DROUGHT STRESSED SHRUBBERY AND PLANTS...BUT WATER SHORTAGES STILL REMAIN A PROBLEM IN MANY AREAS.WATER RESTRICTIONS ALREADY IN PLACE CONTINUE ACROSS CENTRAL ALABAMA'S WATER SHORTAGES COULD BEGIN TO INCREASE IF ADDITIONAL RAINFALL DOES NOT OCCUR. AT THIS TIME...IT IS ESTIMATED THAT ABOUT 50PERCENT OF THE STATE`S POPULATION IS UNDER SOME FORM OF WATER RESTRICTIONS.

OUTLOOK...THE UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM CURRENTLY AFFECTING THE AREA IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN DEPARTING THE REGION ON FRIDAY...WITH DRIER CONDITIONS RETURNING THIS WEEKEND INTO THE FIRST HALF OF NEXT WEEK.ANY ADDITIONAL RAINFALL FROM THIS WEATHER SYSTEM THROUGH FRIDAY WILL BE GENERALLY LIGHT. TEMPERATURES THROUGH THE MIDDLE OF NEXT WEEK WILL BE MORE NORMAL FOR THIS TIME OF YEAR...WITH LOWS AVERAGING IN THE MID 40S TO MID 50S AND HIGHS IN THE MID 60S TO MID 70S BY THE WEEKEND.

THE MEDIUM RANGE FORECAST...FOR OCTOBER 30TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 7TH...IS FOR NEAR NORMAL TEMPERATURES AND NEAR NORMAL PRECIPITATION CHANCES.

Weather History - Oct. 25

1981 - A northbound tornado caused two million dollars damage to Bountstown, FL, in less than five minutes. Fortunately no deaths occurred along its six mile path, which was 30 to 100 yards in width. Radar at Apalachicola had no indication of a tornado or severe weather.

1921 - A hurricane with 100 mph winds hit Tampa, FL, causing several million dollars damage.

Below Average Temperatures Today

Brrr! A very chilly start to your Thursday with below average temperatures. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

A Broad area of Low Pressure will continue to spin across the Deep South today. This broad circulation will continue to draw in moisture forming more showers (off and on) across Central Alabama today. As the Low begins to retrograde back to the Northeast, Have a great day!our rain chances will begin to decrease through the day on Thursday. We do have a small chance of drizzle in the forecast for Friday morning and then gradually clearing in the afternoon. Highs tomorrow will be around 64 degrees. If you are headed out to any of the high school games or Halloween festivities tomorrow night, expect partly cloudy skies with overnight lows dipping down into the upper 40's once again.

By Saturday and Sunday, High Pressure builds back in along with average temperatures. Highs will be around 70 and overnight lows in the upper 40's. Typically for late October we have daytime highs around 72 degrees with overnight lows near 48.

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

Looking at the image above, you might think to yourself, "What the heck?!?" This is an image of the amount of precipitation over the last 7 days. You can see the vast majority of rainfall has occurred much closer to the Gulf of Mexico, along the Panhandle. But you can see that Central Alabama has received anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rainfall with some areas perhaps seeing as much as 5 inches in isolated spots. The U.S. Drought Monitor will release its next update on Thursday morning. It will be interesting to see how this week's rain has influence the drought situation.

Southern California Wildfires

In what seemed like the blink of an eye, wildfires ignited in the paper-dry, drought-stricken vegetation of Southern California over the weekend of October 20, 2007, and exploded into massive infernos that forced hundreds of thousands of people to evacuate their communities. Driven by Santa Ana winds, fires grew thousands of acres in just one to two days. The fires sped down from the mountains into the outskirts of coastal cities, including San Diego. Dozens of homes have burned to the ground, and at least one person has died, according to local news reports. Several of the fires were burning completely out of control as of October 22.

This image of the fires in California was captured at 1:55 p.m. U.S. Pacific Daylight Time on October 22, 2007. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. Thick streamers of smoke unfurl over the Pacific Ocean. The brownish plumes are clouds of dust. Fires northwest of Los Angeles seemed calmer at the time of this image than they were the previous day. (Courtesy of NASA.gov)

Weather History - Oct. 24

1785 - A four day rain swelled the Merrimack River in New Hampshire and Massachusetts to the greatest height of record causing extensive damage to bridges and mills.

1878 - A hurricane produced widespread damage across North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. At Philadelphia PA, the hurricane was the worst of record.

Cool Temperatures in the Forecast

Keep the umbrella handy and also grab the jacket! Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

For Wednesday, a cut-off upper low will continue to spin over the deep south today, and as it does so, it will draw moisture into Central Alabama. An upper level low is a cold pocket of air in the upper atmosphere. It will keep our atmosphere unstable allowing for ample cloud cover to form. Expect off and on showers and drizzle for much of the day. Because of the cloud cover and cool northwest winds, temperatures will struggle to reach 60 degrees during the afternoon.
Tonight will be chilly with lows dipping to the mid 40s under mostly cloudy skies and a chance for showers.

Thursday also looks quite cool with mostly cloudy conditions and highs only in the mid to upper 50s. There will also be a continued chance of scattered showers.

For the remainder of the work week. We have a slight chance of a shower early on Friday, otherwise skies will clear out for the rest of the day just in time for the high school football games Friday night. Right now, the weekend looks spectacular for outdoor activities with mostly sunny skies and afternoon temperatures in the lower 70s and over night lows in the upper 40s.

Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Tornado Reports

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BIRMINGHAM AL
440 PM CDT TUE OCT 23 2007


...NWS SENDS STORM SURVEY CREWS CONFIRM TORNADO DAMAGE IN CENTRAL ALABAMA...
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CONFIRMED 3 TORNADOES TUESDAY AFTER SENDING CREWS TO SURVEY DAMAGE CAUSED BY STORMS THAT MOVED THROUGH CENTRAL ALABAMA LATE MONDAY NIGHT AND EARLY TUESDAY MORNING.


IN BIBB COUNTY...SURVEY CREWS FOUND EVIDENCE OF AN EF1 TORNADO WEST OF THE TOWN OF BRENT. THE PATH IS 7.5 MILES LONG AND 200 YARDS AT ITS WIDEST POINT. CREWS FOUND MINOR DAMAGE TO 3 HOMES, THE MAJORITY OF WHICH WAS AT THE END OF THE TORNADO TRACK ON BEAR CREEK ROAD. THE WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS TORNADO WERE ESTIMATED AT 95 MPH.

IN LOWNDES COUNTY...A SURVEY CREW FOUND EVIDENCE OF AN EF1 TORNADO NORTHEAST OF THE TOWN OF HAYNEVILLE. THE PATH LENGTH IS 3.25 MILES LONG AND 100 YARDS AT ITS WIDEST POINT. CREWS FOUND DAMAGE AT MT.OLIVE CHURCH AND THE AUXILIARY MT. OLIVE CHURCH ON FREDERICK DOUGLASS ROAD...JUST SOUTH OF U.S. HWY 80...ABOUT 5 MILES NORTHEAST OF HAYNEVILLE. A WING OF THE AUXILIARY CHURCH HAD ITS ENTIRE ROOF BLOWN OFF. MULTIPLE TREES WERE BLOWN DOWN IN THE SAME AREA. THE TORNADO CROSSED U.S. HWY 80 ABOUT 5 MILES EAST OF LOWNESDBORO...AND THEN CROSSED COUNTY ROAD 37 JUST NORTH OF HWY 80...BEFORE DISSIPATING. MAXIMUM WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS TORNADO WERE ESTIMATED AT 100 MPH IN THE MT. OLIVE CHURCH AREA.

IN HALE COUNTY...SURVEY CREWS FOUND EVIDENCE OF AN EF1 TORNADO NEAR THE TOWN OF NEW BERN. THE PATH LENGTH WAS 9.4 MILES LONG AND 50YARDS AT ITS WIDEST POINT. THE TORNADO STARTED NEAR COUNTY ROAD 12AND ENDED NEAR HIGHWAY 61 AND COUNTY ROAD 24. APPROXIMATELY 20 HOMES SUSTAINED DAMAGE AND SEVERAL TREES WERE UPROOTED OR SNAPPED OFF. IN ADDITION 12 VEHICLES SUSTAINED DAMAGE. THE WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS TORNADO WERE ESTIMATED AT 100 MPH.

Weather History - Oct. 23

1987 - Thirteen cities in the southeastern U.S. reported record low temperatures for the date. It marked the sixth record low of the month for Greer SC and Columbia SC, and the ninth of the month for Montgomery AL. Showers and thunderstorms deluged Corpus Christi TX with five inches of rain. Winnemucca NV reported their first measurable rain in ninety-two days, while Yakima WA reported a record 96 days in a row without measurable rainfall.

More Rain and Cooler Temps in the Forecast

Showers and a few thunderstorms are likely today as a cold front approaches us from the West. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

The Cold Front we've been monitoring the past couple of days will slowly move eastward across Central Alabama today. As it does so, it will bring more beneficial rains to the drought stricken Southeastern U.S. Ahead of the front, a line of heavier showers will affect Eastern Alabama (East of I-65), while behind the front, light to moderate showers will continue to move into Western Alabama. Temperatures behind the front are dropping into the upper 50's and lower 60's. Daytime highs today will be reached before lunchtime in the lower 70's and drop through the afternoon hours.

The NWS issued this HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK for today: A FEW STRONG THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE FROM NOON UNTIL 6 PM TODAY FOR AREAS ALONG AND EAST OF A LINE FROM SELMA...TO THORSBY...TO LINEVILLE. THE PRIMARY THREAT WILL BE GUSTY WINDS OF 25 TO 35 MPH AND HEAVY DOWNPOURS.

For tonight, expect a chance for showers, otherwise cloudy with a morning low near 52. Wednesday, a cut-off upper low will keep rain chances in the forecast for the remainder of the work week. We have a 40% chance for showers tomorrow, otherwise cloudy, with daytime highs in the mid 60's.

Monday, October 22, 2007

Weather History - Oct. 22

1987 - Twenty-two cities in the eastern U.S., most of them in the southeast states, reported record low temperatures for the date. Morning lows of 30 degrees at Athens GA, 28 degrees at Birmingham AL, and 23 degrees at Pinson AL, were the coldest of record for so early in the season.

Showers and Thunderstorms Likely

Showers and thunderstorms are likely both today and tomorrow. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

A Warm front is approaching us from the Gulf and we have already seen a few showers this morning. Showers will increase in intensity and coverage this afternoon, as the Warm Front moves Northward today. We will see periods of heavy rain and a few thunderstorms throughout the day. An unstable air mass will also move northward across the CBS 42 viewing area as the warm front approaches. We can't rule out the possibility for some strong to severe storms this afternoon into the evening hours. The SPC has put western sections of our viewing area from Vernon to Tuscaloosa to Centreville to Selma under a slight risk for severe thunderstorms. Stay with CBS 42 and we will keep you posted on this situation. Remember, it's always a good idea to have a severe weather plan with your family and to keep fresh batteries in your NOAA Weather Radio.

Tomorrow, showers and thunderstorms are likely as a cold front approaches us front the west. We can't rule out the possibility for strong thunderstorms once again. Temperatures will be in the lower 70's with mostly cloudy skies. Rain chances will back off towards the end of the week with temperatures remaining in the low to mid 70's.

Stay with CBS 42 as we keep you up to date with the latest forecast.

Hazardous Weather Outlook

The NWS has issued this Hazardous Weather Outlook for the following counties: AUTAUGA-BARBOUR-BIBB-BLOUNT-BULLOCK-CALHOUN-CHAMBERS-CHEROKEE-CHILTON-CLAY-CLEBURNE-COOSA-DALLAS-ELMORE-ETOWAH-FAYETTE-GREENE-HALE-JEFFERSON-LAMAR-LEE-LOWNDES-MACON-MARENGO-MARION-MONTGOMERY-PERRY-PICKENS-PIKE-RANDOLPH-RUSSELL-SHELBY-ST CLAIR-SUMTER-TALLADEGA-TALLAPOOSA-TUSCALOOSA-WALKER-WINSTON-

DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT.STRONG TO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTPORTION OF THE FORECAST AREA FROM 3 PM UNTIL 9 PM. AS A WARM FRONTLIFTS NORTHWARD THIS MORNING...UNSTABLE AIR WILL PUSH NORTHWARD INTOSOUTH CENTRAL ALABAMA. THE STORM PREDICTION CENTER HAS PLACED AREASWEST OF A LINE FROM VERNON...TO TUSCALOOSA...TO CENTREVILLE...TOSELMA...UNDER A SLIGHT RISK OF SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS. ATMOSPHERICWINDS WILL BE FAVORABLE FOR AN ISOLATED TORNADO..

DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...TUESDAY THROUGH MONDAY.STRONG TO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE TUESDAY AFTERNOON FORAREAS WEST OF I-65. A COLD FRONT WILL SLOWLY APPROACH CENTRAL ALABAMAFROM THE WEST ON TUESDAY. THE AIR MASS WILL DESTABILIZE TUESDAYAFTERNOON AS TEMPERATURES RISE INTO THE 70S.

Sunday, October 21, 2007

Washing the Car


** I had this article to post several days ago but the severe weather knocked me out on Friday. I slept all day and forgot about it until just now. Please enjoy and remember for later. -CD

Warm, sunny weather often means that people will be headed outside to wash the car, but did you know that a garden hose can use up to 10 gallons of water per minute? That means that a ten-minute wash can use enough water to fill 100 one-gallon milk jugs! With abnormally dry and drought conditions persisting through more than half of the U.S., this is a good time to think about conserving water at home.

Consider taking your car to a commercial car wash that recycles water - these types of washes use significantly less water than a home wash. If you must wash your car at home, park it on a grassy area, which will allow water to soak into the ground instead of running off into the street and storm drain, and use an automatic shut-off nozzle on your hose to avoid wasting water. Remember to check your local water use restrictions before washing your car at home.

(Sources: "Water Conservation and Washing Vehicles."
http://www.mde.state.md.us/Programs/WaterPrograms/Water_Conservation/Household_Tips/carwashing.asp (This is a Maryland Department of Environment website, but tips apply broadly); US EPA. After the Storm. http://www.epa.gov/weatherchannel/stormwater.html)

Drought Continues

As the drought continues, most counties in North Georgia are under a state of emergency due to the Extreme Conditions. My Parents live on Lake Lanier and I will add some pictures to show you how dry it is there. I know it is just as bad here in Alabama. Send us your photos at: weathershots@wiat.com .



From the first of January through the middle of October the lack of rainfall this year in the cities of Atlanta and Athens has been almost unprecedented. For the period January 1 through October 15, there have been only TWO years drier than 2007.


In Atlanta the driest year on record through October 15 is 1931 when only 23.14 inches were recorded. 1954 was the second driest year with 24.53. The total in 2007 was 24.68 inches.


In Athens the driest year on record through October 15 is 1954 when only 21.56 inches were recorded. 1925 was the second driest year with 21.96. The total in 2007 was 22.32 inches.


The lack of rainfall across all of northern Georgia has resulted in exceptional drought conditions which, among other things, has resulted in extremely low water levels in area lakes and reservoirs. Examples are in the photos below.


2007 has also been dry in Columbus and Macon - just not quite so extreme. The January through mid-October period this year is the 6th driest on record in Columbus and the 25th driest at Macon.


While the month of October is typically the driest of the year, there have been large amounts recorded in past Octobers. In Atlanta 11.04 inches fell in 1995, and 8.41 inches fell that same year in Columbus. Athens has also seen over 11 inches during the month of October ( 11.23 in 1937 ).


Weather History - Oct. 21

1987 - Cold arctic air continued to invade the central U.S. Eleven record lows were reported in the Great Plains Region, including lows of 12 degrees at Valentine NE, and 9 degrees at Aberdeen SD. Temperatures warmed rapidly during the day in the Southern and Central Plains Region. Goodland KS warmed from a morning low of 24 degrees to an afternoon high of 75 degrees.

1988 - Joan, the last hurricane of the season, neared the coast of Nicaragua packing 125 mph winds. Joan claimed more than 200 lives as she moved over Central America, and total damage approached 1.5 billion dollars. Crossing more than 40 degrees of longitude, Hurricane Joan never strayed even one degree from the 12 degree north parallel.

1989 - Unseasonably cold weather continued to grip the south central and southeastern U.S. Twenty cities reported record low temperatures for the date, including Calico AR with a reading of 26 degrees, and Daytona Beach FL with a low of 41 degrees. Squalls in the Great Lakes Region finally came to an end, but not before leaving Marquette MI buried under 12.7 inches of snow, a record 24 hour total for October.
Sunday Outdoor Activities

With all the nice weather, get outdoors today. The warm and dry conditions will be leaving us shortly, so enjoy it while it's here! Here are a few ideas for outdoor activities:

Take a hike at Oak Mountain State Park or Ruffner Mountain

Go to the lake at Oak Mountain State Park and take a picnic

Visit a pumpkin patch

Take a hay ride (if your not allergic!)

Play a round of golf at your local course

Play a round of frisbee golf

Play a tennis game

Take the children to a local playground

Take the pets out for a walk

Eat outside at a local cafe

Saturday, October 20, 2007

Thursday's Severe Weather Summary

...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STORM SURVEYS FIND EF0 TORNADO AND STRAIGHT LINE WIND DAMAGE...

AN NWS STORM SURVEY CREW WAS SENT TO MARION AND WINSTON COUNTIES.THEY SURVEYED AN AREA IN MARION COUNTY APPROXIMATELY 2.7 MILES SOUTHWEST OF HALEYVILLE. THE PATH LENGTH WAS 0.06 MILES AND THE PATHWIDTH WAS 50 YARDS. TREES AND POWERLINES WERE DOWNED ON HWY 129 AND THERE WAS DAMAGE TO A HOUSE ALONG THE PATH. SOME DEBRIS WAS ALSO THROWN 300 FT BEYOND THE END OF THE PATH. THE ESTIMATED WIND SPEED WAS 80 MPH...MAKING THIS AN EF0 TORNADO.

A SECOND AREA WAS SURVEYED IN THE TOWN OF PEBBLE ABOUT 5.9 MILES NORTHEAST OF HALEYVILLE. APPROXIMATELY A DOZEN SHINGLES WERE BLOWN OFF OF A ROOF...ONE CEDAR TREE AND SEVERAL LARGE LIMBS WERE ALSO BLOWN DOWN. THE DAMAGE WAS CONFINED TO AN AREA 300 YARDS LONG BY 300YARDS WIDE..AND WAS CAUSED BY STRAIGHT LINE WINDS. WIND SPEED WAS ESTIMATED AT 60 MPH.

THE EF1 TORNADO THOUGHT TO HAVE INITIATED IN WINSTON COUNTY WAS DISCOVERED TO BE EXCLUSIVELY IN LAWRENCE COUNTY ALABAMA. THIS IS LOCATED IN THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HUNTSVILLE COUNTY WARNING AREA.

Weather History - Oct. 20

1770 - A great storm struck eastern New England causing extensive coastal damage from Massachusetts to Maine, and the highest tide in 47 years.

1989 - Forty-nine cities reported record low temperatures for the date as readings dipped into the 20s and 30s across much of the south central and southeastern U.S. Lows of 32 degrees at Lake Charles LA and 42 degrees at Lakeland FL were records for October, and Little Rock AR reported their earliest freeze of record. Snow blanketed the higher elevations of Georgia and the Carolinas. Melbourne FL dipped to 47 degrees shortly before midnight to surpass the record low established that morning. Showers and thunderstorms brought heavy rain to parts of the northeastern U.S. Autumn leaves on the ground clogged drains and ditches causing flooding. Up to 4.10 inches of rain soaked southern Vermont in three days. Flood waters washed 600 feet of railroad track, resulting in a train derailment.

Weather Discussion

Enjoy beautiful weather for the weekend. But more changes are just around the corner. Hello, I'm Chief Meteorologist, David Sawyer.
Thanks to another strong high pressure system bringing dry air and pleasant temperatures, we will enjoy awesome weather for outdoor activities this weekend.
As we head into Saturday evening, clear skies will prevail with light winds. Because of the dry air in place, our atmosphere will cool down quickly after sunset. As a result, expect chilly temperatures overnight with lows in the upper 40s to lower 50s.
Sunday will also have pleasantly warm temperatures with highs in the mid 80s under mostly sunny skies.
Sunday night into Monday, another batch of Gulf moisture will stream our way ahead of yet another cold front. This system will bring a decent chance of showers and thunderstorms as we head back to work and school next week.
Interestingly, an upper level low pressure system is expected to stall over the deep south next week. If this occurs, we will have a continued chance of showers and possible thunderstorms for much of next week. This would be great news for our drought situation.
Now, you may wonder, "what is a cut off low"? Well, this is a situation when a storm system becomes detached from the jet stream. The jet stream is a fast section of wind in our upper atmosphere. It is the dividing line between cold air masses and warm air masses. When a storm system remains a part of the jet stream pattern, the fast flowing winds of the jet stream keep the storm system moving along. This is illustrated by the following picture below. Notice the "U" shape in the black lines of this upper atmosphere chart. This "U" shape is called a Trough of Low Pressure. The entire flow pattern of blue color on this chart following the black lines from west to east, including the "U" shaped trough, is the jet stream.
As you will see on this next chart below, notice how the black lines become a circle over the Southern Plain States and the Lower Mississippi River Valley. This "circle", called an upper level low pressure system, is now detached from the main flow of the jet stream pattern. Since this upper level low pressure is going to become detached from the main flow of the jet stream, the upper level low will stall and sit over the deep south for the next few days.
As a result, this upper level low will keep our atmosphere unsettled bringing us an extended chance of scattered showers or thundershowers. As long as this upper level low pressure system remains stalled, or "cut-off" from the jet stream pattern, it will remain over the deep south with a continued chance of rain.
If this forecast does come true for us, it will be great news regarding our drought situation with the extended chance of rain for much of our work week beginning on Monday 10/22/07.
Stay with CBS 42 as we keep you up to date with the latest forecast.

Thursday, October 18, 2007

Tornado Warning





THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
CENTRAL SUMTER COUNTY IN WEST CENTRAL ALABAMA...
THIS INCLUDES THE CITY OF LIVINGSTON...* UNTIL 330 PM CDT* AT 256 PM CDT...
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO 7 MILES SOUTH OF LIVINGSTON...OR NEAR YORK...MOVING NORTHEAST AT 20 MPH.*
THE TORNADO WILL BE NEAR... LIVINGSTON BY 310 PM CDT...
THE SAFEST PLACE TO BE DURING A TORNADO IS IN A BASEMENT. GET UNDER AWORKBENCH OR OTHER PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT ISAVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IN ANINTERIOR HALLWAY OR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET. USE BLANKETS OR PILLOWS TOCOVER YOUR BODY AND ALWAYS STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS.
IF IN MOBILE HOMES OR VEHICLES...EVACUATE THEM AND GET INSIDE ASUBSTANTIAL SHELTER. IF NO SHELTER IS AVAILABLE...LIE FLAT IN THENEAREST DITCH OR OTHER LOW SPOT AND COVER YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR HANDS
A TORNADO WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 1100 PM CDT THURSDAY EVENINGFOR NORTHWESTERN ALABAMA.

Monitoring the Threat for Severe Weather

There is a threat for strong to severe thunderstorms today. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

Gulf moisture is streaming northward into Central Alabama behind a warm front. With the instability in our atmosphere, we are seeing showers this morning with winds out of the South 10-15 mph. Additionally, a cool front will move across the CBS 42 viewing area later today. This will kick up a line or two of strong thunderstorms before crossing our skies on Friday. Again some of the storms could become severe before the cool front ushers drier and more stable air by Friday afternoon. It's always a good idea to keep fresh batteries in your NOAA Weather Radio and have a severe weather plan established with your family.

For today, expect mostly to partly cloudy skies and highs in the low to mid 80s on Thursday. We may see a few breaks in the clouds this afternoon, therefore, the more sunshine we receive will result in a greater risk of severe thunderstorms this afternoon into tonight. Right now, the main threats look to be damaging winds and we can't rule out the possibility for an isolated tornado. The Storm Prediction Center has our area under a slight risk for severe thunderstorms today. Stay with CBS 42 and we will keep you updated!

This front will clear us out just in time for the weekend. We do have a chance for showers and thunderstorms Friday morning and then clearing out during the afternoon hours. Highs will be near 80. Right now, the weekend looks to have abundant sunshine with pleasantly warm temperatures in the upper 70s on Saturday to mid 80s during the afternoon on Sunday. Cool readings in the low to mid 50s overnight will be quite pleasant.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Severe Weather Potential

Here is information on the severe weather potential over the deep south overnight Wednesday and Thursday from the Severe Storms Prediction Center. Please stay with the CBS 42 Weather Team as we monitor and track this weather situation.


CONVECTIVE OUTLOOK
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
0803 PM CDT WED OCT 17 2007
VALID WEDNESDAY NIGHT - THURSDAY MORNING

...THERE IS A MDT RISK OF SVR TSTMS OVER PARTS OF ERN OK...SRN AND CNTRL MO AND MUCH OF AR...
...THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS FROM ERN PARTS OF THE SRN AND CNTRL PLAINS THROUGH THE LOWER AND MID MS VALLEY...
...ERN OK THROUGH LOWER AND MID MS VALLEY REGION...

EARLY WEDNESDAY EVENING A DRYLINE EXTENDS FROM A SURFACE LOW IN WRN KS SWD THROUGH CNTRL OK...N CNTRL AND CNTRL TX. A WARM FRONT EXTENDS FROM SRN IL WWD INTO CNTRL MO THEN SWWD INTO NRN OK WHERE IT INTERSECTS THE DRYLINE. NUMEROUS MESOSCALE BOUNDARIES EXIST IN WARM SECTOR WHERE THE ATMOSPHERE REMAINS MARGINALLY TO MODERATELY UNSTABLE WITH MLCAPE FROM 500-1200 J/KG FROM ERN OK INTO THE LOWER MS VALLEY. WV IMAGERY AND RUC OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS SHOW A STRONG VORT MAX OVER CNTRL KS AND OK WITH ATTENDANT MID LEVEL JET ACROSS SRN OK AND NRN TX. THIS FEATURE WILL EJECT NEWD THROUGH THE MID MS VALLEY OVERNIGHT. AS THIS OCCURS THE SURFACE LOW WILL LIFT NEWD INTO THE UPPER MS VALLEY WITH THE LOW LEVEL JET STRENGTHENING TO 65+ KT AS IT SHIFT NEWD THROUGH THE MARGINALLY UNSTABLE WARM SECTOR ACROSS MO AND IL. DESPITE THE RECENT OVERALL WEAKENING TREND DUE TO LOSS OF DAYTIME HEATING...THE THREAT OF ISOLATED STRONG TORNADOES IS EXPECTED TO PERSIST INTO MUCH OF TONIGHT. GREATEST THREAT IS EXPECTED OVER PARTS OF THE LOWER TO MID MS VALLEY REGIONS WHERE ASCENT ATTENDING NEWD EJECTING VORT MAX AS WELL AS LARGE LOW LEVEL HODOGRAPHS AND DEEP LAYER SHEAR WILL EXIST. THREAT FARTHER NWD INTO CNTRL AND NRN IL IS MORE CONDITIONAL DUE TO MARGINAL INSTABILITY IN THIS REGION.

Fall Severe Weather Awareness Day

courtesy of the NWS Birmingham...

In 2006, 4 tornadoes occurred on November 30th during a very unique severe weather episode across parts of West Central Alabama.(click for summary)

In 2006, 8 tornadoes occurred on November 15th across Central Alabama as a severe line of thunderstorms moved through. (click for summary)

In 2005, 6 tornadoes occurred on November 28th across Central Alabama as a severe line of thunderstorms moved through. (click for summary)

In 2004, 21 tornadoes and widespread wind damage occurred during the early morning hours of November 24 across Central Alabama as a severe line of thunderstorms moved through. (click for summary)

In 2003, a significant line of thunderstorms plowed through Alabama on November 18, resulting mainly in significant straight-line wind damage. Two F1 tornadoes touched down near Tuscaloosa and Oakman. (click for summary)

In 2002, the infamous Veteran's Day Tornado Outbreak brought 11 tornadoes to parts of North and Central Alabama. Two F3 tornadoes occurred across Fayette, Walker, and Winston counties. (click for summary)

In 2001, the largest tornado outbreak in Alabama's recorded history occurred on November 24, 2001 as 34 tornadoes occurred during a 24-hour period. (click for summary)

In 2000, an F4 tornado occurred near Tuscaloosa with the December 16 outbreak. 13 additional tornadoes occurred across Alabama on that date. (click for summary)

Follow this link for more information:

http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/aware/fall_severe_awareness.php

Weather History - Oct. 17

1781 - General Cornwallis attempted to escape encirclement by crossing York River, "but a violent storm arose" dispersing his boats causing him to ask for an armistice.

1950 - Small but powerful Hurricane King struck Miami, FL. The hurricane packs winded to 122 mph, with gusts to 150 mph. Hurricane King then moved up the Florida peninsula to Georgia. Four persons were killed and damage was 28 million dollars.

1988 - Thunderstorms produced severe weather in the Middle Mississippi Valley and the Lower Ohio Valley. Severe thunderstorms spawned three tornadoes in Indiana, including one which injured four persons. Strong thunderstorm winds at Connerville IND caused three million dollars damage. Thunderstorms in Illinois produced hail two inches in diameter Colfax.

1989 - Showers and thunderstorms representing the remnants of Hurricane Jerry deluged southeast Kentucky with four to six inches of rain in 18 to 24 hours, resulting in widespread flash flooding. Flooding resulted in more than five million dollars damage. Temperatures again warmed into the 80s and lower 90s in the southeastern U.S. Lakeland FL and Orlando FL reported record highs of 95 degrees.

Strong Storms are Possible

Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

Gulf moisture will continue to stream northward into Central Alabama over the next couple of days. Additionally, a cool front will move across the CBS 42 viewing area late Thursday. This will kick up a line or two of strong thunderstorms. Some of the storms could become severe.

For today, expect a chance for showers and thunderstorms this afternoon and into the overnight hours. Some of these storms could be strong at times with the main threats being heavy rain and gusty winds. Otherwise, expect mostly to partly cloudy skies and highs in the low 80s. However, the best chance for showers and thunderstorms will come Wednesday night into Thursday morning as a disturbance moves northward from the Gulf of Mexico. Overnight lows will be near 70 degrees.

Thursday morning, we may see a few more strong storms. The main threats will be heavy rain and gusty winds. Thursday afternoon into Thursday night a few severe storms are possible along and ahead of an approaching cold front. At this time, the main threat looks to be damaging winds along the front. However, we can't rule out the possibility for an isolated tornado. The Storm Prediction Center has our area under a slight risk for severe thunderstorms on Thursday. Stay with CBS 42 and we will keep you updated!

This front will clear us out just in time for the weekend. Right now, the weekend looks to have abundant sunshine with pleasantly warm temperatures in the low to mid 80s during the afternoon and cool readings in the low to mid 50s overnight.

Tuesday, October 16, 2007

A Change To Our Weather Pattern

An interesting atmospheric set up will bring us more rain and even a possibility of severe weather. Hello, I'm Chief Meteorologist, David Sawyer.

So far this summer and fall, we have been stuck in a drought situation with high pressure dominating the eastern third of the United States. The sinking air associated with high pressure systems has prevented normal amounts of clouds and showers from forming.

However, it looks like our jet stream pattern is getting more active. As a result, cool fronts and low pressure systems will work their way toward the east causing the dominant ridge of high pressure to break down.

If this continues to happen, expect a more active weather pattern with a increased chance of rain and possible severe weather associated with some of the stronger low pressure systems and associated cold fronts crossing the deep south where we live.

With all this said, Gulf moisture is poised to stream our way over the next couple of days. Additionally, a cool front will move across central Alabama late Thursday. This will kick up a line or two of strong thunderstorms. Some of the storms could become severe.

For Wednesday, expect a chance for showers and thunderstorms, mainly during the afternoon and evening hours with the daytime heating. Highs will be in the low 80s during the afternoon with southeast winds between 5 and 10 mph. However, a better chance for showers and thunderstorms will come Wednesday night as Gulf moisture becomes more abundant across central Alabama behind a warm front.


On Thursday, expect another good chance for showers and thunderstorms as the cool front approaches our area. Some of these storms could be strong or severe. The Storm Prediction Center has us under a slight risk for severe thunderstorms on Thursday. Stay with CBS 42 and we will keep you updated!

This front will clear us out just in time for the weekend. Right now, the weekend looks to have abundant sunshine with pleasantly warm temperatures in the low to mid 80s during the afternoon and cool readings in the low to mid 50s overnight.

Weather History - Oct. 16

1987 - Ten cities in the southeastern U.S. reported record low temperatures for the date. The low of 34 degrees at Augusta GA marked their third straight morning of record cold. A cold front brought showers and thunderstorms to parts of the central U.S. Lightning struck a bull and six cows under a tree near Battiest OK.

1989 - Heavy snow blanketed the foothills of Colorado. Up to three inches was reported around Denver. Echo Lake was buried under nineteen inches of snow. Temperatures again warmed into the 80s and lower 90s in the eastern and south central U.S. Thirteen cities reported record high temperatures for the date, including Atlantic City NJ with a reading of 84 degrees.

Potential Severe Weather

This is the SPC Discussion on the potential threat for severe weather. Hopefully David or I will be able to post a brief discussion this afternoon or evening after we get a chance to talk. Click on the map for a larger picture.


DAY 3 CONVECTIVE OUTLOOK


NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK

0236 AM CDT TUE OCT 16 2007

...THERE IS A MDT RISK OF SVR TSTMS ACROSS MUCH OF IL AND INDIANA...SERN WI...SRN LOWER MI...AND PARTS OF WRN KY....

...THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS ACROSS A LARGE PORTION OF THE CONUS BETWEEN THE MS VALLEY AND THE APPALACHIANS...

...SYNOPSIS...

MID-LEVEL TROUGH CROSSING THE CENTRAL U.S. IS FORECAST TO INTENSIFY AND TAKE ON AN INCREASINGLY-NEGATIVE TILT WITH TIME. MEANWHILE...ASSOCIATED SURFACE LOW WILL MOVE FROM IA INTO THE UPPER GREAT LAKES REGION THROUGH THE PERIOD AS COLD FRONT SWEEPS EWD ACROSS THE MIDWEST/OH VALLEY AND SEWD ACROSS THE GULF COAST STATES THROUGH 19/12Z.

...ERN CONUS ROUGHLY FROM THE MS VALLEY EWD TO THE APPALACHIANS... WIDESPREAD/POTENTIALLY-SIGNIFICANT SEVERE WEATHER EVENT IS EVIDENT FOR DAY 3...AS LARGE UPPER TROUGH/LOW AND ASSOCIATED STRONG COLD FRONT MOVE EWD ACROSS THE MS VALLEY. AHEAD OF THE FRONT...A VERY LARGE WARM SECTOR IS ANTICIPATED...WHICH COMBINED WITH SOME DIURNAL HEATING SHOULD RESULT IN MARGINAL TO LOCALLY-MODERATE INSTABILITY.

ATOP THE MOIST/DESTABILIZING BOUNDARY LAYER...VERY STRONG DEEP TROPOSPHERIC WIND FIELD IS FORECAST TO OVERSPREAD THE FRONTAL ZONE INTO THE WARM SECTOR...WITH 60 TO 80 SSWLY FLOW AT MID-LEVELS FORECAST ATOP THE FRONT DURING THE AFTERNOON.

SCATTERED STORMS/STORM CLUSTERS SHOULD BE ONGOING ACROSS A LARGE PORTION OF THE AREA DURING THE DAY...WITH AN INCREASE IN CONVECTIVE INITIATION EXPECTED IN MULTIPLE BANDS CLUSTERS ALONG/AHEAD OF COLD FRONT AS IT CROSSES THE MS VALLEY DURING THE AFTERNOON. WHILE FLOW ROUGHLY PARALLEL TO THE FRONT DOES NOT APPEAR TO FAVOR NUMEROUS/PRIMARILY DISCRETE STORMS...STORM MODE IS IMPOSSIBLE TO DETERMINE AT THIS POINT. IT WOULD APPEAR THAT SOME COMBINATION OF ISOLATED AND LINEAR STORMS WILL BE ONGOING DURING THE AFTERNOON -- LIKELY PRODUCING HAIL/DAMAGING WINDS...AS SHEAR WILL BE STRONGLY-SUPPORTIVE OF LONG-LIVED/WELL-ORGANIZED STORMS. DEGREE OF LOW-LEVEL SHEAR AND PRESENCE OF MOIST BOUNDARY LAYER ALSO SUPPORTS A THREAT FOR TORNADOES.

ATTM...WILL INTRODUCE A MODERATE RISK ACROSS PARTS OF THE MIDWEST...WHICH MAY BE EXPANDED TO INCLUDE AREAS AS FAR S AS THE GULF COAST STATES IN LATER FORECASTS.

THREAT WILL LIKELY CONTINUE INTO THE OVERNIGHT HOURS...PERHAPS SHIFTING ACROSS THE APPALACHIANS LATE.

Rain Chances Increasing

A frontal system will increase our rain chances this week. Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

The high pressure system that has kept us dry the past week has moved eastward, allowing moisture to gradually return to Alabama with warm, southeasterly winds.
An area of disturbed weather in the Northern Gulf of Mexico is streaming moisture northward into the Florida Panhandle and Southern Alabama today. This system is producing heavy amounts of rain and lots of lightning. Models have been indicating this for a few days now. Although for now, it looks like the best chances for rain with this system will be south of a line from Selma to Lafayette, AL.

For today, expect a slight chance for showers, mainly during the afternoon/evening hours with the daytime heating. A better chance for showers and thunderstorms on Wednesday as the frontal system gets a little bit closer to us. Highs will remain in the low to mid 80's. Thursday, expect another good chance for showers and thunderstorms. Some of these storms could be strong to severe. The Storm Prediction Center has us under a slight risk for severe thunderstorms on Thursday. Stay with CBS 42 and we'll keep you posted!

Monday, October 15, 2007

Increasing Moisture May Produce a Better Shot of Rain

A frontal system will bring us an increase chance for rain this week. Hello, I'm Chief Meteorologist, David Sawyer.

The high pressure system that has kept us dry the past week will move eastward, allowing moisture to gradually return to Alabama with warm, southeasterly winds.

Tuesday and Wednesday, a frontal system will slowly approach central Alabama. This will increase our chance of rain slightly on Tuesday with highs near 80.

Then, on Wednesday, the chance of rain will increase further as this frontal system gets even closer to us. At this time, it does look as though the system will begin to weaken somewhat as it approaches Alabama. Consequently, although our rain chances will increase, expect only scattered showers and thunderstorms for the middle part of the work week.

Another storm system gets cranked up in the pacific northwest which will drop another cold front into central Alabama by the end of the week. This system will bring us a little better rain chances with it on Thursday and Friday. However, the forecast remains very tricky. Both the GFS and NAM forecast models are turning up with very different solutions as far as our rain chances this week. The GFS is significantly wetter than the NAM so there is some major disagreement. The models have been flip flopping the past few model runs, but I'm hopeful that we will see some beneficial rain towards the end of our work week.

Stay with CBS 42 and we'll keep you updated!

Weather History -- Oct. 15

** First let me say this.. I had a few computer issues at home on Sunday and was unable to post a Wx History for that day. Laptop is back to functioning and posting continues. My apologies.

1954 - Hurricane Hazel struck the Carolina coastline. The hurricane demolished every pier along a 170 mile stretch from Myrtle Beach SC to Cedar Island NC, and obliterated entire lines of beach homes. Hurricane Hazel also destroyed 1500 homes as it moved inland with seventeen foot tides. Winds between Myrtle Beach SC and Cape Fear NC gusted to 150 mph. Hurricane Hazel caused 163 million dollars damage, and claimed the lives of 98 persons.

1987 - Unseasonably cold weather continued in the eastern U.S., with thirteen cities reporting record low temperatures for the date. The low of 34 degrees at Montgomery AL was their coldest reading of record for so early in the season. Lows of 32 degrees at Harrisburg PA and 34 degrees at Parkersburg WV marked their third straight morning of record cold.

1989 - Hurricane Jerry made landfall at Galveston, TX, at 6:30 PM (CDT). Winds at the Galveston Airport reached 75 mph, with gusts to 100 mph. Tides along the island were six to eight feet, and rainfall totals ranged up to slightly more than six inches north of Beaumont. Three persons were killed when their vehicle was blown off the Galveston seawall into the pounding surf. Total damage along the Upper Texas Coast was estimated at fifteen million dollars. Thunderstorms produced severe weather in Lower Michigan during the late morning. Two persons were injured when a tree fell on their camper at the Traverse City State park. While strong northerly winds ushered much colder air into the central U.S., unseasonably warm weather continued in the south central and eastern U.S. The afternoon high of 82 degrees at Bluefield WV was a record for October.

Rain Chances this Week

A frontal system will bring us an increase chance for rain this week. Hello, I'm meteorologist, Lauren Whisenhunt.

The high pressure system that has kept us dry the past week will move eastward, allowing moisture to gradually return to Alabama with warm, southeasterly winds. Expect partly cloudy skies on Monday with temperatures in the mid 80's. Tuesday and Wednesday we have a slight chance for showers and possibly even a thunderstorm due to an approaching frontal system to our west. Otherwise, expect partly cloudy skies and highs around 84. At this time, it does look as though the system will begin to weaken somewhat as it approaches Alabama, unfortunately! We could definitely use the rain it has been dumping in parts of the Great Plains today. Another storm system gets cranked up in the pacific northwest which will drop another cold front into central Alabama by the end of the week. This system will bring us a little better rain chances with it on Thursday and Friday. However, the forecast remains very tricky. Both the GFS and NAM forecast models are turning up with very different solutions as far as our rain chances this week. The GFS is significantly wetter than the NAM so there is some major disagreement. The models have been flip flopping the past few model runs, but I'm hopeful that we will see some beneficial rain towards the end of our work week. Stay with CBS 42 and we'll keep you updated!

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Fall or Summer?

While we had a great tast of fall this weekend, don't pull out those sweaters just yet. We will have temperatures above average for the next seven days. Our average highs for this upcoming week are in the mid 70's and our lows in the lower 50's to upper 40's. That will not be the case for us this week however. Our highs this week will range from the lower to mid 80's and our lows in the mid to upper 60's! Quite a difference...especially for our lows. A frontal system at the end of the week will drop our temperatures back down to more seasonal measures for the weekend... but no big cool down in store for us over the next week.

Saturday, October 13, 2007

Water Efficiency




Currently, 78 percent of Alabama is experiencing extreme drought, and more than 58 percent of the state is experiencing exceptional drought. Extreme drought in a region means that major loss of crop or pasture is likely, fire risk is extreme, and water shortages and restrictions are widespread; exceptional drought indicates extreme water shortages in reservoirs, wells, river and streams, which can result in water emergencies.

The average American uses up to 100 gallons of water each day - enough to fill up 1600 eight-ounce glasses! Most water used indoors is used in the bathroom, and adding water-efficient fixtures to your bathroom not only saves water, but it also saves energy. Consider adding a water-efficient toilet to your home. If just one percent of homes in American switched to a high-efficiency toilet, which uses 75-80 percent less water than older versions, we could save enough electricity to power 43,000 homes for one month!

(Sources: U.S. Drought Monitor: October 9, 2007: Alabama. http://drought.unl.edu/dm/DM_state.htm?AL,SE; EPA WaterSense Program. "Using Water Efficiently: Ideas for Residences," http://www.epa.gov/watersense/pubs/res.htm and "Benefits of Water Efficiency," http://www.epa.gov/watersense/water/benefits.htm)

Weather History - Oct. 13th

1846 - A great hurricane tracked across Cuba, Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia and Pennsylvania. The hurricane inflicted major damage along its entire path, which was similar to the path of Hurricane Hazel 108 years later. The hurricane caused great damage at Key West FL, and at Philadelphia PA it was the most destructive storm in thirty years.

1987 - Fifteen cities in the eastern U.S. reported record low temperatures for the date. Record lows included 34 degrees at Meridian MS, 28 degrees at Paducah KY, and 26 degrees at Beckley WV. Another surge of arctic air entered the north central U.S. bringing snow to parts of Wyoming and Colorado.

Weekend Outdoor Activities

Head outdoors this weekend and enjoy the nice weather. Here are a few ideas of activities going on in central Alabama.

Saturday:
Race for the Cure at Lynn Park

UAB Blazers Football at Legion Field

St. George Middle Eastern Food Festival at Byzantine Church

Pumpkin Patches

Junior Patron's Pompeii Preview Party at the Museum of Art (tonight)

Sunday:
Vulcan Aftertunes at Vulcan Park

Friday, October 12, 2007

Weather Disco....






In the weather world... a weather discussion is sometimes referred to as a "weather disco"

Okay, so Fall is officially here if you look at a calendar, but someone forgot to mention that to Summer. This is the part of the show where the clowns start dancing and the air raid siren goes off and then they come after you with the big hook. (Credits: Showtime at the Apollo)

The Ridge of High Pressure will continue to dominate through the weekend. This will allow for maximum amount of sunshine and warm temperatures. The "coolness" of the air mass that brought us these pleasant mornings is slowly fading. As an Air mass sits in place (or slowly moves) it modifies. The cool air is slowly warming from the abundance of sunshine. Combine that with a change in the atmospheric flow and we will begin to pick up and Easterly Flow and then Southeasterly Flow which will begin to increase the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. A developing Low Pressure System to the West will begin to approach and clouds should begin to increase slowly on Monday. By Tuesday, we will introduce some small rain chances into the forecast. The amount of precipitation will be dependant upon the moisture recovery. No moisture = no rain. Little Moisture = little rain and so on...

Football forecast for the UAB Blazers- Temperatures should be between 70 and 78 degrees for tailgating. Kickoff is at 6:00PM at Legion Field and the temperature will be around 74 degrees. By the end of the game it will be cool, but comfy near 58 degrees. We expect to see clear skies throughout the day.

Weather History - Oct. 12

1962 - The "Columbus Day Big Blow" occurred in the Pacific Northwest. It was probably the most damaging windstorm of record west of the Cascade Mountains. Winds reached hurricane force, with gusts above 100 mph. More than 3.5 billion board feet of timber were blown down, and communications were severely disrupted due to downed power lines. The storm claimed 48 lives, and caused 210 million dollars damage.

1987 - Floyd, the only hurricane to make landfall the entire season, moved across the Florida Keys. Floyd produced wind gusts to 59 mph at Duck Key, and up to nine inches of rain in southern Florida. Sixteen cities in the Ohio Valley and the Middle Mississippi Valley reported record low temperatures for the date. Record lows included 27 degrees at Paducah KY, and 24 degrees at Rockford IL and Springfield IL.

1989 - Temperatures again warmed into the 80s in the Central Plains Region and the Middle Mississippi Valley, with 90s in the south central U.S. Six cities reported record high temperatures for the date, including Fort Smith AR with a reading of 92 degrees. Strong winds along a cold front crossing the Great Lakes Region and the Ohio Valley gusted to 61 mph at Johnstown PA.

Thursday, October 11, 2007

A Short Weather Disco....

Friday, expect another beautiful, fall day with highs in the mid-70's. This is quite a change from the temperatures we saw earlier in the week with highs in the upper 80's to low 90's. The air-mass will be extremely dry as well so for those of you prone to sinus infections etc.. get out those humidifiers if you haven't already. However, pollen levels will remain low today and tomorrow so that is definitely good news.
The forecast is fairly easy right now. Strong High Pressure remains in control over the Eastern US for another few days right through the weekend. This means cool mornings and mild afternoons. As the Airmass begins to modify, afternoons will gradually creep back into the low 80's by the end of the weekend. Another developing storm system out west could bring us a few showers early next week. Timing should bring a few showers around the area on Tuesday.

Temperature Round Up..

As Cooler Temperatures emerge, I wanted to list for you the Highs and Lows of the day.

HIGH LAST 12 HOURS. LOW LAST 18 HOURS. PRECIP LAST 24 HOURS: READINGS AS OF 10/12/00Z OR 7PM LOCAL

STATION ID HI LO PCPN
:ANNISTON :ANB 71 / 49 / 0.00:
AUBURN :AUO 75 / 54 / 0.00:
BIRMINGHAM INTL :BHM 71 / 49 / 0.00:
BROOKLEY FIELD :BFM 84 / 59 / 0.00:
CALERA :EET 72 / 52 / 0.00:
DECATUR :DCU 70 / 42 / 0.00:
DOTHAN :DHN 82 / 54 / 0.00:
EVERGREEN :GZH 79 / 53 / 0.00:
HUNTSVILLE :HSV 70 / 45 / 0.00:
MOBILE :MOB 83 / 62 / 0.00:
MONTGOMERY :MGM 78 / 51 / 0.00:
MUSCLE SHOALS :MSL 71 / 45 / 0.00:
TROY :TOI 79 / 50 / 0.00:
TUSCALOOSA :TCL 74 / 53 / 0.00

Weather Discussion is forthcoming.

Weather History - Oct. 11

1846 - The Great Key West Hurricane of 1846 struck Florida on this date, marking one of the most devastating hurricanes in the 19th century. The storm put Key West under 5 feet of water and destroyed two major lighthouses.

1988 - Low pressure brought gale force winds to the Great Lakes Region, with snow and sleet reported in some areas. Unseasonably warm weather prevailed in the north central U.S. The mercury hit 84 degrees at Cutbank MT and Worland WY. The temperature at Gunnison CO soared from a morning low of 12 degrees to a high of 66 degrees.

Wednesday, October 10, 2007

If Spring has Sprung Does Fall Fall?

If we say "Spring has Sprung" would we say "Fall has Fallen?" Hello, I'm Meteorologist, Charles Daniel.

I don't think I have ever actually said, "Spring has Sprung," (I think mostly because it is bad grammar and a bit cliche').

But Fall has Fallen.. I know, I know. I said it. (Shaking my head in disgust).

The Cold Front that brought us rain on Tuesday is long gone, but a secondary Cold Front with a re-enforcement of dry and cooler air is on its way this evening. We actually still saw Highs in the mid 80's on Thursday (just like I said it would be), but those will be no more for a few days.

A clear night will allow the maximum radiational cooling to occur and I wouldn't be surprised to see several sites, namely Gadsden, Hamilton, and maybe even Cullman or Holly Pond to see the mid 40's overnight tonight. Brrrrr! I am a warm weather kinda guy. Really.

With plenty of sunshine to go around on Thursday and Friday I think we will warm up to the mid to maybe upper 70's. So its going to be quite a change from what we have had the last few weeks. The air-mass will be extremely dry as well so for those of you prone to sinus infections etc.. get out those humidifiers if you haven't already.

...VERY LOW RESERVOIR LEVELS ACROSS CENTRAL ALABAMA...

THE CURRENT DROUGHT IN CENTRAL ALABAMA HAS PRODUCED MUCH BELOW NORMAL ELEVATIONS ON AREA LAKES AND RESERVOIRS. THE MOST SEVERELY IMPACTED MAJOR RESERVOIRS ARE THOSE LOCATED ON THE COOSA AND TALLAPOOSA RIVERS...WITH MANY AT OR BELOW NORMAL WINTER POOL LEVELS. HOWEVER...THESE LEVELS HAVE NOT YET REACHED RECORD LOW LEVELS SET IN PREVIOUS YEARS. LISTED BELOW ARE SOME OF THE MOST SEVERELY IMPACTED ALABAMA POWER COMPANY RESERVOIRS...THEIR RECORD LOW LEVELS AND DATES OF OCCURRENCE...AND TODAY`S STAGES.

LAKE/RIVER RECORD LOW LEVEL/DATE TODAY`S LEVEL

WEISS LAKE/COOSA RIVER 556.31 FT 1/01/1970 557.6 Ft

NEELY HENRY LAKE/COOSA RIVER 498.45 FT 2/13/1997 504.8 FT

LOGAN MARTIN LAKE/COOSA RIVER 458.27 FT 10/17/1972 459.8 FT

HARRIS LAKE/TALLAPOOSA RIVER 779.40 FT 11/07/2000 781.2 FT

MARTIN LAKE/TALLAPOOSA RIVER 452.12 FT 6/29/1941 477.2 FT

LEWIS SMITH LAKE/BLACK WARRIOR 488.84 FT 12/02/1971 492.2 FT

THESE VERY LOW LEVELS HAVE MADE MANY...IF NOT MOST...BOAT LANDINGS UNUSABLE ON THESE LAKES. MANY DOCKS ARE COMPLETELY OUT OF THE WATER. SOME COMMUNITIES NEAR THESE LAKES ARE ALSO BEING THREATENED WITH WATER SHORTAGES...AS LAKE STAGES DROP TO NEAR THE LEVELS OF WATER INTAKES USED TO PUMP WATER INTO THEIR SYSTEMS.

OTHER MAJOR RESERVOIRS ALONG THE TOMBIGBEE AND BLACK WARRIOR RIVERS HAVE ALSO BEEN IMPACTED BY THE DROUGHT...ALTHOUGH NOT AS SEVERELY AS THOSE ON THE COOSA AND TALLAPOOSA RIVERS

WITH A LA NINA CURRENTLY UNDERWAY...THE OUTLOOK HEADING INTO THE WINTER SEASON IS FOR WARMER AND DRIER THAN NORMAL CONDITIONS ACROSS CENTRAL ALABAMA. IF A DRIER THAN NORMAL WINTER DOES MATERIALIZE...IT IS UNLIKELY SIGNIFICANT IMPROVEMENT IN WATER SHORTAGES ON THESE RESERVOIRS WILL OCCUR ANYTIME SOON.